The tale of a showstopping wedding dress

Today I wanted to share with you one of my latest additions to my collection and a piece that I know will never leave me.

The dress in question is this stunning wedding dress. The dress date to 1948 and demonstrates the vogue in the UK for 30s styled bridal gowns in the late 1940s when the “new look” was still in its infancy. The dress features typical characteristics that replicate Hollywood style 30s glamour with its gently padded shoulder fishtail hem and slim sleeves.  The dress- to my mind- also has elements of Queen Elizabeth’s wedding dress,  with the shaping at the neckline and slim sleeves (I am sure she had a huge influence on wedding fashions seeing as she married just a year before this wedding dress was produced!)

                                                                    (apologies for the wonky pic, i was trying to show off the hem to its best advantage!)

This dress though is not just any old (beautiful) wedding dress. I recently acquired two pairs of beautiful platform 1940s shoes and this is actually the wedding dress of the same lady. You can read all about them here. This means that I now have her wedding ensemble dress, shoes and veil. I feel a certain sense of pride and happiness that i can keep the legacy of this evidently very stylish woman going by keeping the three elements of her wedding ensemble together. What I found amazing is that such glorious items could have been purchased on post war ration coupons. I imagine that she must have been a relatively wealthy lady to have afforded such beautiful shoes and dress, although she must have had to scrimp on other items of clothing to have enough coupons to buy the dress and shoes.
The original owner of the dress and shoes died in April and I hope that I can keep a little bit of her legacy going by keeping the items together. Whilst I don’t intend to wear the dress (despite it being a perfect fit) it really does demonstrate a certain vogue in wedding dress styles at the end of the 1940s and will still  be put into good use, as I will be taking it to talks with me in the near future.

Rayne shoes: Icons of the 20th century

After the talk about couture shoes Nick Rayne of the Rayne family spoke to us. He was completely inspiring and SUCH a great speaker. I never previously understood quite how important Rayne are in terms of tracking the history of the shoe in the 20th century, but he really showed quite how innovative the company were in their day.

The Rayne company began in 1885 as theatre outfitters, started by Henry and Mary Rayne. There were many new theatres built in the late 1800’s and the family cashed in on this. Their first shop was located close to the theatres on Shaftesbury avenue which had been a slum clearance

The theatres inevitably led to the ballet and dance and hence dance shoes. This was where their first links came with the company they would later come to be. Adeline Genee was one of the first to promote the company. She was very famous in Europe and in 1897 came to England for what was meant to be six weeks and stayed for 10 years. Rayne provided all of her shoes and costumes when she first came over to the U.K.

It is thought that a lot of the costumes for the Ballet Russes also came from Rayne. Although, this is simply speculation as the costumes tended not to be marked and the only evidence comes from company invoices. Diaghilev was very difficult to deal with and was notorious for doing runners to Paris when he did not want to pay!

In the 1920’s Charles Rayne saw a gap in the market and realised that shoe design may be the next avenue for the company. The new store opened on 58 New Bond street. The logo that is now synonymous with Rayne was also designed around this time. They used a lot of American production techniques, this included using American soles to make the shoes more comfortable and flexible. The sizes and fittings were also based on American sizes. Rayne had designers based in America. Many of these people were first generation Italians so had instilled in them the ideas of Italian superior craftsmanship.

The company then went from strength to strength gaining their first royal warrant in the 1930’s after Queen Mary had the brand recommend to her by one of her ladies in waiting.

It is probably the designs of the 1950’s though which Rayne are best remembered for, elegant, expertly crafted and presented in their iconic yellow boxes. I have come across quite a few pairs of 50s Rayne shoes on my vintage travels and goodness me they tend to be good quality! It was during this period that Rayne had many iconic designers working with them including importantly Roger Vivier, who designed the shoes for both the Queens wedding and Coronation with the Rayne brand.

One of the things that interested me most was their collaboration with Wedgewood in 1958. This was a series of shoes designed in a number of fabrics (satin and leather formed the bulk of the range) with real solid china heels. At the time there was an advertisement where they stood a London bus on top of the heels and they didn’t break! Nick said that to his knowledge none were ever retuned for chipping or breaking. The china was incredibly solid.

The 1950’s also saw them move to a new store on Old Bond Street. The interior design was by the renowned theatre designer Oliver Messel. The store was decorated in the regency style with Japanese silk wallpaper. The sad ending is that whilst his was a beautiful building and one of the few examples of Messel’s work the Whole building was sledge hammered in 1987. The company who owned it had to destroy it over one weekend before it became a listed building on the Monday. It is so sad the lengths people will go to simply to gain better access to office space!

Images from Victoria and Albert museum and wikipedia

The couture shoe

This week has literally been mental not only have I been working a crazy amount, I’ve also been on 4 courses at the V and A. I just wanted to share with everyone some of the amazing information I learnt!

My course on Thursday was all about the history of the couture shoe. Fiona Campbell was the speaker.

The concept of couture began with Charles Frederick Worth an English designer who was based in Paris at the end of the 19th century. The term couture comes from the French- Haute Couture- meaning High sewing. Worth was not just a designer but also a craftsman and an artist who completely revolutionised design. Although my focus here is not on his dresses (wonderful as they were), but rather the shoes that were worn underneath his and other couturiers dresses.

Under these beautiful couture dresses to begin with women were still wearing long lace up boots. These boots were made of fine kidskin and commissioned through the couturiers. This was when the shoemaker was yet to come into their own as ankles were still completely covered up. The idea of the couture shoe had yet to arrive.

Pinet, now a largely forgotten name was the man to change all of this. The Louis heel had been popular for decades, but he bought in a new heel shape the Pinet heel. This heel was a little bit higher and narrower than the Louis heel. He established that shoe designers no longer had to follow the exact whims of the clothing designers and could actually establish their own creative businesses.

It was the shoes designed Perugia (another forgotten name!) who really established the concept of the fashion or “art” shoe. He came from a long line of shoemakers. He started working with the family company at 16 and soon complained that the company was all about making and not about design. He decided that he wanted to carve his own name for himself and took is work to Nice. Here he managed to get a showcase in the Negresso hotel to display his shoes.

One of his first customers saw the shoes here and was dressed by Poiret. Poiret saw his customer wearing the shoes and loved them. He asked Perugia to come to Paris and work with him. Unfortunately due to World War One Perugia couldn’t go. Although this came to be a good thing as during the war Perugia worked in engineering and managed to put many of the practices he learnt into designing more avant-garde shoes.

After World War One finished he finally had the opportunity to work with Poiret and many of the motifs he was using on his shoes related directly with Poiret’s clothing. His shoes during this period showed how he was inspired by the art movement surrounding him, something that would again be important in his later career.
His shoes during the 1920’s were completely lavish and he really met the spirit of the times as hemlines had risen and finally shoes were shown off used to complete and compliment an outfit. He was well known for using lavish embroidery and covering shoes completely in clawed rhinestones.

This pair of shoes are one of my favourite by Perugia. These shoes are from 1931 (I think they look modern even by today’s standards) and were inspired by George Braque.

This pair of shoes I think has to be my favourite. (I think) they were created for Mistinguett in 1948. If you took a quick glance at them though you could quite easily be mistaken for thinking they were Christian Louboutin’s and from a far later date! Perugia was well known for designing shoes with up to 7in heels.

The other designer who was discussed in detail was Ferragamo. He was just 9 years old when he was apprenticed to a Naples shoemaker and at 10 he set up his own workshop and repaired locals shoes. Aged 16 he moved to America where he was closely located to the American film company and with a brother working in film costume he managed to establish links with the company. In 1923 Ferragamo designed all the footwear for the film the Ten Commandments by Cecil Bde Mille. This film helped to bring about a new trend in shoes. At this time women were still wearing very high cut shoes, but this film bought about a craze for sandals.

Ferragamo designed shoes fro many of the leading lights in the entertainment world throughout the 30’s, 40’s and 50’s including Greta Garbo and Audrey Hepburn. Although the design style he is probably best remembered for is his wedge sole. He started designing these in 1936 (trying to bridge the gap between comfort and elegance) and within two years 86% of all shoes in America had wedge soles!

Images from the Met museum collection database and
http://theshoegoddess.com/2007/04/andre-perugia-the-master-from-1928-1977.html